Przejdź do głównej treści

Widok zawartości stron Widok zawartości stron

Aktualia

Starsze aktualności: 2020 2019 2018

Astronomy Object of the Month: Complex Structure of the Eastern Lobe of the Pictor A Radio Galaxy

Illustration: The 0.5–7.0 keV merged Chandra image of the entire structure of Pictor A, smoothed with 3σ Gaussian radius, with the 1.45 GHz VLA total and polarized intensity (3σ) contours superimposed (red and white, respectively). The two elongated yellow rectangles denote the areas across the high-polarization regions of the Eastern lobe, for which the team extracted the surface brightness profiles at X-ray and radio frequencies. Image credit: The Authors. Pictor A, classified as a Broad-Line Radio Galaxy with the “classical double” (Fanaroff-Riley type II) large-scale radio morphology and located at the redshift z=0.035, is one of the most prominent radio galaxies in the sky and the prime target for detailed multiwavelength investigations in the recent decades, from radio to the X-ray ranges. Now, JU astronomers present the detailed analysis of the distinct X-ray emission features present within its Eastern radio lobe utilising the data obtained from the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

The large-scale radio and X-ray jet in Pictor A originates in the galaxy nucleus and extends up to hundreds of kilo parsecs beyond the host galaxy to the West. The so-called counter-jet is not prominent at radio waves, but can be easily spotted in deep X-ray maps by the Chandra Observatory. The hotspots, located at both sides of the core at the lobes’ edges, mark the termination points of the jets to the West and East. The bright Western hotspot is clearly detected and even resolved at radio, infrared, optical and X-ray frequencies. The radio lobes appear in X-rays as a low-surface brightness cocoon surrounding the large-scale structure of the jets.

Illustration 1: The 0.5–7.0 keV merged Chandra image of the entire structure of Pictor A, smoothed with 3σ Gaussian radius, with the 1.45 GHz VLA total and polarized intensity (3σ) contours superimposed (red and white, respectively). The two elongated yellow rectangles denote the areas across the high-polarization regions of the Eastern lobe, for which the team extracted the surface brightness profiles at X-ray and radio frequencies. Image credit: The Authors.

The large-scale radio and X-ray jet in Pictor A originates in the galaxy nucleus and extends up to hundreds of kilo parsecs beyond the host galaxy to the West. The so-called counter-jet is not prominent at radio waves, but can be easily spotted in deep X-ray maps by the Chandra Observatory. The hotspots, located at both sides of the core at the lobes’ edges, mark the termination points of the jets to the West and East. The bright Western hotspot is clearly detected and even resolved at radio, infrared, optical and X-ray frequencies. The radio lobes appear in X-rays as a low-surface brightness cocoon surrounding the large-scale structure of the jets.

Extended lobes in radio galaxies, formed as backflows when the jet plasma passes through the termination shock and is turned away at the contact discontinuity between the shocked outflow and intergalactic medium, are particularly prominent at radio frequencies, due to the synchrotron emission of ultra-relativistic electrons. While the detailed radio studies of the lobes with the arcsecond angular resolution often reveal a complex morphology with filamentary structures, their X-ray observations, carried out with modern instruments such as Chandra, allowed to resolve the lobes and detect the emission consistent with a non-thermal power-law continuum. Lobes are expected to be extremely low-density but high-pressure envelops surrounding (and also confining) the jets, believed to be filled solely by ultra-relativistic electrons and magnetic field, with the total internal energy equal to that of the jet bulk kinetic energy. However, several observational findings have recently been reported on large amounts of a thermal gas also present in the lobes, providing a prominent contribution to their X-ray radiative output and the pressure balance.

In the recent paper, JU scientists analyzed the archival Chandra data for the extended lobes of Pictor A, focusing on the Eastern (E) lobe and the complex E – hotspot region. The X-ray maps of these targets were compared in detail with various radio maps of the regions, obtained with the Very Large Array (VLA) radio interferometer.

Top: A zoomed view of the rotation measure distribution within the E hotspot region in Pictor A, with the polarized intensity L band contours superimposed. Contours start from 3σ confidence level and are scaled by √2. Bottom: A zoomed view of the 0.5–7.0 keV emission of the E hotspot region in Pictor A, with the 1.45 GHz polarized intensity contours (black) superimposed. The Chandra image is smoothed with 3σ Gaussian (radius 5 px). Radio contours start from 3σ confidence level. Regions selected for the Chandra data analysis are labeled and indicated by red contours. Credit: The Authors.Illustration 2: Top: A zoomed view of the rotation measure distribution within the E hotspot region in Pictor A, with the polarized intensity L band contours superimposed. Contours start from 3σ confidence level and are scaled by √2. Bottom: A zoomed view of the 0.5–7.0 keV emission of the E hotspot region in Pictor A, with the 1.45 GHz polarized intensity contours (black) superimposed. The Chandra image is smoothed with 3σ Gaussian (radius 5 px). Radio contours start from 3σ confidence level. Regions selected for the Chandra data analysis are labeled and indicated by red contours. Credit: The Authors.

The obtained images and results reveal some interesting features. First of all, the double structure of the hotspot is prominent in both total radio intensity and polarized radio intensity maps. So-called ‘secondary’ hotspot (the most prominent and outermost radio feature to the East) coincides with some enhancement in the diffuse X-ray emission, but nonetheless appears dramatically weaker at keV photon energies than the Western hotspot, placed on the other side of the nucleus. There are also several bright compact X-ray sources in the closest vicinity of the double E hotspot, but none of which coincides with the peaks of either total or polarized radio intensity. For the spectral analysis, the team selected four such distinct regions. On the polarized radio intensity maps, all of these happen to be located almost exactly at the edges of the hotspot’s double structure. Moreover, one of the bright compact X-ray sources (P5) lies well outside the radio emission on high-resolution maps.

A relation of point-like X-ray features with no optical counterparts to the radio lobes and hotspot regions of radio galaxies and radio quasars is unclear and subjected to speculations. Such features may simply be background AGNs, unrelated to the observed radio lobe, but may also result from various energy dissipation processes taking place within the lobes with complex magnetic field structure. For example, if the lobes’ radio filaments represent indeed tangled magnetic field tubes, then at the places of the filaments’ interactions with density or magnetic enhancements in the surrounding plasma, localized multiple compact sites of violent reconnection may form, loading turbulence and thus enabling efficient particle acceleration as well as plasma heating.

However, the main findings following from this Pictor A analysis regard the elongated X-ray filament A, located upstream of the jet termination region and extending for at least 30 kpc. Its 0.5–7.0 keV radiative output is consistent with a pure power-law emission, or alternatively a combination of a flat power-law component and a thermal plasma. In the former case, the X-ray slope would be consistent (within the errors) with the slope of the radio continuum at the position of the filament. The latter case would be, on the other hand, in accord with recent findings of a larger amount of a thermal gas possibly present within the radio lobes of radio galaxies.

Contact

Dr Rameshan Thimmappa

Astronomical Observatory
Jagiellonian University

R.Thimmappa [at] uj.edu.pl

Original publication

R. Thimmappa, Ł. Stawarz, U. Pajdosz-Śmierciak, K. Balasubramaniam, V. Marchenko, Complex Structure of the Eastern Lobe of the Pictor A Radio Galaxy: Spectral Analysis and X-ray/Radio Correlations, 2021, [astro-ph.HE]

The research was conducted at the Department of High Energy Astrophysics of the Jagiellonian University’s Astronomical Observatory (OAUJ). This research has made use of data obtained from the Chandra Data Archive. The work was supported by the PolishNSC grant 2016/22/E/ST9/00061.

Astronomiczny Obiekt Miesiąca: Rentgenowska lupa poprawia widoczność odległych czarnych dziur

Na ilustracji: Schemat działania soczewki grawitacyjnej MGB 2016+112. Źródło: NASA/CXC/M. Weiss; NASA/CXC/SAO/D. Schwartz et al. Astronomowie uchwycili niespotykany dotąd obraz emisji rentgenowskiej pochodzącej z układu czarnych dziur we wczesnym Wszechświecie. Wykorzystali w tym celu naturalną kosmiczną soczewkę. To „szkło powiększające” zostało po raz pierwszy użyte do wyostrzenia obrazów rentgenowskich zebranych przez Obserwatorium Chandra. Zarejestrowano szczegóły morfologii czarnych dziur, które w normalnych warunkach są zbyt odległe, aby można je było badać za pomocą istniejących teleskopów rentgenowskich.

W badaniach wykorzystano zjawisko soczewkowania grawitacyjnego, występujące, gdy światło odległych obiektów jest zakrzywiane przez duże skupiska mas – takie jak galaktyka położona na linii widzenia, pomiędzy nami a dalekim obiektem. Soczewkowanie może znacząco powiększać i wzmacniać światło składające się na widoczny obraz obiektu, a także tworzyć jego zduplikowane kopie. Konfiguracja tych powielonych obrazów może być wówczas użyta do rozszyfrowania złożoności obiektu i wyostrzenia jego widoczności.

Na ilustracji : Schemat działania soczewki grawitacyjnej MGB 2016+112. Źródło: NASA/CXC/M. Weiss; NASA/CXC/SAO/D. Schwartz et al.

Para czarnych dziur, badana dzięki takiej soczewce grawitacyjnej w ramach omawianej pracy naukowej, nosi nazwę MG B2016+112. Promienie rentgenowskie wykryte przez Chandrę były emitowane przez ten układ już wtedy, gdy Wszechświat miał zaledwie 2 miliardy lat. To niewiele w porównaniu z jego obecnym wiekiem, wynoszącym prawie 14 miliardów lat. Wysiłki uczonych zmierzające do zrozumienia tak odległych obiektów widocznych na falach rentgenowskich byłyby skazane na niepowodzenie, gdyby nie mieli oni do dyspozycji tego naturalnego szkła powiększającego.

Najnowsze badania opierają się na wcześniejszych pracach prowadzonych przez Cristianę Spingolę z INAF w Bolonii. Wykorzystując dostępne obserwacje radiowe obiektu MGB2016+112, ona i jej zespół znaleźli dowody na istnienie w nim pary szybko rosnących supermasywnych czarnych dziur, oddzielonych od siebie jedynie o około 650 lat świetlnych. Odkryto też, że obie czarne dziury prawdopodobnie posiadają dżety.

Korzystający z modelu soczewkowania grawitacyjnego zbudowanego w opaciu o te dane radiowe astronomowie doszli następnie do wniosku, że trzy obrazy źródeł promieniowania rentgenowskiego wykryte w MG B2016+112 są rezultatem zjawiska soczewkowania dla dwóch różnych obiektów. Te dwa obiekty emitujące promieniowanie rentgenowskie są najprawdopodobniej parą supermasywnych czarnych dziur lub jedną rosnącą, supermasywną czarną dziurą i jej dżetem. Szacowana separacja przestrzenna tych obiektów jest przy tym zgodna z wynikami wcześniejszych badań prowadzonych na falach radiowych.

Poprzednie obserwacje par i trójek rosnących supermasywnych czarnych dziur z udziałem teleskopu Chandra obejmowały głównie obiekty leżące znacznie bliżej nas, lub położone znacznie dalej od siebie. Już wcześniej zaobserwowano dżet rentgenowski w jeszcze większej odległości od Ziemi, przy czym jego światło wyemitowane zostało, gdy Wszechświat liczył sobie zaledwie 7% obecnego wieku. Jednak tamta emisja dżetu była oddalona od czarnej dziury o około 160 000 lat świetlnych.

Nowy wynik jest istotny, ponieważ daje nam kluczowe informacje o szybkości wzrostu czarnych dziur we wczesnym Wszechświecie, a także poszerza wiedzę z zakresu możliwości wykrywania układów podwójnych czarnych dziur. Soczewka grawitacyjna wzmacnia światło rentgenowskie tych odległych obiektów, które w przeciwnym przypadku byłoby zbyt słabe do wykrycia. Zarejestrowana dzięki temu emisja jednego ze składników widocznych w MG B2016+112 może być nawet 300 razy jaśniejsza niż sam jego obraz uzyskany bez soczewkowania.

Astronomowie odkrywają czarne dziury o masach miliardy razy większych niż masa Słońca, powstałe zaledwie setki milionów lat po Wielkim Wybuchu. Chcą teraz rozwiązać zagadkę czarnych dziur – dowiedzieć się, w jaki sposób tak szybko nabrały one masy we wczesnym Wszechświecie. Dane dostępne dzięki soczewkom grawitacyjnym mogą też umożliwić im oszacowanie, w ilu takich układach podwójnych dwie supermasywne czarne dziury krążą na tyle blisko siebie, by ostatecznie wytworzyć możliwe w przyszłości do wykrycia fale grawitacyjne.

Ten wynik jest poruszającym dowodem na to, jak bardzo takie „szkło powiększające” pomaga w badaniach odległych supermasywnych czarnych dziur przy użyciu nowatorskich metod. Bez tego efektu Chandra musiałaby obserwować je kilkaset razy dłużej, a nawet wtedy nie ujawniłaby tak skomplikowanych struktur – podsumowuje współautorka badań, Anna Barnacka (CfA/Uniwersytet Jagielloński), która opracowała technikę przekształcania soczewek grawitacyjnych w wysokorozdzielcze „teleskopy” do badań odległych obiektów.

Niepewność wyznaczonego położenia jednego z obiektów rentgenowskich w MG B2016+112 to 130 lat świetlnych w jednym wymiarze i 2000 w drugim, prostopadłym do niego. Oznacza to, że rozmiar obszaru, w którym prawdopodobnie znajduje się to źródło, jest ponad 100 razy mniejszy niż obszar możliwy do wyznaczenia dla typowego źródła widzianego przez teleskop Chandra, które nie jest soczewkowane. Taka precyzja w określaniu położeń obiektów leżących w podobnych odległościach od nas nie ma sobie równych we współczesnej astronomii rentgenowskiej.

 

Kontakt

Dr hab. Anna Barnacka

Obserwatorium Astronomiczne
Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego

A.Barnacka [at] uj.edu.pl

Oryginalna publikacja: Daniel Schwartz, Cristiana Spingola, Anna Barnacka, Resolving Complex Inner X-ray Structure of the Gravitationaly Lensed AGN MGB2016+112, 2021, The Astrophysical Journal, 917, 26.

Przedstawione wyniki są częścią badań prowadzonych w Zakładzie Astrofizyki Wysokich Energii Obserwatorium Astronomicznego Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego w Krakowie. Programem Chandra zarządza należące do NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

Astronomiczny Obiekt Miesiąca: J0028+0035 - radiogalaktyka fidget spinner

Cygnus AFidget spinner to spopularyzowana w 2017 r. zabawka zręcznościowa składająca się zazwyczaj z czterech łożysk połączonych wytrzymałym plastikiem, przypominająca swym kształtem trójkąt z centralnym łożyskiem służącym jako uchwyt.

Radioastronomowie w mapowaniu nieba korzystają z potężnych radioteleskopów – w podobny sposób, jak przeprowadza się obserwacje teleskopami optycznymi, na przykład przy użyciu Kosmicznego Teleskopu Hubble'a, wykonującego zdjęcia gwiazd i galaktyk. Obrazy wykonane za pomocą teleskopu radiowego prezentują jednak niebo zupełnie inaczej. Na „niebie radiowym” gwiazdy i galaktyki nie są widoczne bezpośrednio. Widać na nim liczne złożone struktury połączone z supermasywnymi czarnymi dziurami w centrach galaktyk. Większość pyłu i gazu otaczającego supermasywną czarną dziurę zostaje przez nią pochłonięta, ale część materii może zostać z bardzo dużą prędkością wyrzucona w przestrzeń kosmiczną. Naładowane cząstki tej materii, poruszające się w słabym polu magnetycznym, tworzą rozległe struktury – radiogalaktyki, które możemy obserwować właśnie dzięki radioteleskopom.

Na ilustracji 1: Cygnus A – obraz typowej radiogalaktyki. Jądro radiowe znajdujące się w centrum niezbyt odległej galaktyki (przesunięcie ku czerwieni z ~ 0,06) jest stowarzyszone z supermasywną (ok. 2,5 miliardów mas Słońca) czarną dziurą. Emanują z niego w przeciwnych kierunkach, nie zawsze dobrze widoczne, strugi naładowanych relatywistycznych cząstek, które są zakończone gorącymi plamami. Z gorących plam materia dyfunduje w kierunku centrum obiektu, tworząc olbrzymie, ekspandujące płaty. Rozmiar radiogalaktyki (mierzony pomiędzy gorącymi plamami) wynosi ok. 400 tysięcy lat świetlnych. Źródło: kompozycja własna na podstawie obserwacji VLA przedstawionych w pracy: Perley, R. A., Dreher, J. W., Cowan, J. J., 1984, ApJ, 285L, 35.).

Rysunek 2: Lewa strona: mapa radiogalaktyki J0028+0035 z nietypową potrójną strukturą w centrum, uzyskana na 323 MHz interferometrem GMRT. Jej rozmiar wynosi około 3,8 milionów lat świetlnych (dla porównania – odległość Galaktyki i M31 wynosi około 2,5 miliona lat świetlnych). Prawa strona: fidget spinner – popularna zabawka zręcznościowa przypominająca swym kształtem centralną strukturę radiogalaktyki J0028+0035. Źródło: kompozycja własna na podstawie danych zawartych w publikacji zespołu oraz dostępnych w Internecie.

Na pierwszym obrazku przedstawiona jest typowa radiogalaktyka. Składa się ona z centralnego jądra, cienkich strug relatywistycznej materii zakończonych gorącymi plamami i olbrzymich płatów. Tytułowa radiogalaktyka J0028+0035 posiada w centrum trzy składniki, których morfologia przypomina właśnie fidget spinnera. Centralny składnik widoczny po lewej stronie to odległy blazar niezwiązany fizycznie z pozostałymi, widocznymi na mapie, obiektami. Dwa pozostałe składniki znajdujące się po prawej stronie, widoczne lepiej w większym powiększeniu na następnym obrazku, stanowią miniaturową radiogalaktykę składającą się z jądra i płatów. J0028+0035 należy do rzadkiej klasy radiogalaktyk restartujących – to dwie struktury w zawarte w jednej, posiadającej składniki pochodzące z dwóch różnych cyklów aktywności centralnego obiektu.

W oparciu o dane radiowe z szerokiego zakresu od 74 MHz do 14 GHz udało się określić parametry fizyczne (takie jak ciśnienie, gęstość, szybkość propagacji, wiek) struktur radiowych J0028+0035. Wiek zewnętrznych – starych – płatów wynosi 245 milionów lat, a wewnętrznych – młodych – tylko 3,6 miliona lat. Pomiędzy pierwszą i drugą fazą aktywności nastąpił 11-milionowy okres uśpienia. Po więcej szczegółów odsyłamy do oryginalnej publikacji.

Dodatkowo, w ramach „zabawy” z radiogalaktykami, zapraszamy do „Radio Galaxy Zoo: LOFAR”, które jest częścią projektu Zooniverse, największej i najpopularniejszej na świecie platformy badań naukowych opartych na zaangażowaniu społeczeństwa. Uczestnicząc w projekcie „LOFAR Radio Galaxy Zoo” można wziąć udział w ekscytującej naukowej przygodzie i pomóc profesjonalnym radioastronomom w eksploracji Wszechświata. 

 

Kontakt

Prof. Marek Jamrozy

Obserwatorium Astronomiczne
Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego

M.Jamrozy [at] uj.edu.pl

Oryginalna publikacja: Marecki, A., Jamrozy, M., Machalski, J., Pajdosz-Śmierciak, U., Multifrequency study of a double-double radio galaxy J0028+0035, 2021, MNRAS, 501, 853.

Przedstawione wyniki są częścią badań prowadzonych w Zakładzie Astronomii Gwiazdowej i Pozagalaktycznej oraz Zakładzie Radioastronomii i Fizyki Kosmicznej Obserwatorium Astronomicznego Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego w Krakowie. Zostały uzyskane przy finansowym wsparciu Narodowego Centrum Nauki w ramach grantu NCN 2018/29/B/ST9/01793.

Astronomiczny Obiekt Miesiąca: Kinematyka koronalnych wyrzutów masy w polu widzenia LASCO

Deep fields lofarDokładne zrozumienie mechanizmu propagacji koronalnych wyrzutów masy (CME) ma kluczowe znaczenie w przewidywaniu pogody kosmicznej. CME generują burze geomagnetyczne, które mogą powodować katastrofalne w skutkach uszkodzenia sieci energetycznych na Ziemi i poważne zagrożenia radiacyjne dla satelitów krążących na niskiej orbicie okołoziemskiej i ich załóg podczas spacerów kosmicznych.

Podstawowe parametry CME, prędkości i przyspieszenia zmieniające się wraz z czasem i ich odległością od Słońca, dają naukowcom możliwość przewidzenia poszczególnych czasów ich przybywania w okolice Ziemi. W omawianym artykule przeanalizowano trend zmienności tych parametrów w 23 i 24 cyklu słonecznym.

Na ilustracji: Ewolucja koronalnego wyrzutu masy widziana przez koronografy LASCO na pokładzie Obserwatorium Słonecznego i Heliosferycznego (SOHO). Widać tu wyraźnie trzy struktury: (1) jasną przednią (prowadzącą) krawędź, (2) ciemną jamę i (3) jasne, zwarte jądro. Źródło: NASA’s SOHO/LASCO.

Pogoda kosmiczna jest kontrolowana głównie przez koronalne wyrzuty masy (CME), będące ogromnymi erupcjami namagnesowanej plazmy z atmosfery słonecznej. Zostały one szeroko zbadane pod kątem znaczącego wpływu na środowisko Ziemi. Pierwszy ze znanych CME zarejestrował koronograf obecny na pokładzie satelity Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO-7). Od roku 1995 roku CME są intensywnie badane przy użyciu czułego instrumentu LASCO znajdującego się na pokładzie statku kosmicznego SOHO -- Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. SOHO/LASCO do grudnia 2017 roku zarejestrowały około 30 000 zdarzeń CME. Podstawowe parametry CME, określone ręcznie na podstawie obrazów z LASCO, są zachowane i udostępniane za pośrednictwem katalogu SOHO/LASCO. Prędkości początkowe CME, parametry uzyskane przez dopasowanie regresji liniowej do punktów na wykresie dla danych wysokość-czas, są podstawowym parametrem stosowanym w przewidywaniu możliwego wpływu koronalnych wyrzutów masy na geomagnetyczne otoczenie Ziemi.

Dwa podstawowe parametry, prędkość i przyspieszenie CME, są uzyskiwane przez dopasowanie prostej i kwadratowej zależności do wszystkich punktów pomiarowych (wysokość-czas) dostępnych dla danego zdarzenia -- wyrzutu CME. Wyznaczone w ten sposób parametry w pewnym sensie odzwierciedlają ich średnie wartości w polu widzenia koronografów LASCO. Jednak oczywiste jest, że oba te parametry zmieniają się w sposób ciągły wraz ze zmienną odległością CME od Słońca i czasem ich propagacji w przestrzeni. Zatem i stosowane w wielu badaniach średnie wartości prędkości i przyspieszenia nie dają nam pełnego opisu propagacji i ewolucji CME. W nowym artykule przedstawiono natomiast statystyczne analizy kinematycznych właściwości dla 28894 CME zarejestrowanych przez LASCO od 1996 do połowy 2017 roku. Badania te obejmują dużą liczbę zdarzeń zaobserwowanych podczas 23 i 24 cyklu słonecznego. Wykorzystano dane katalogowe SOHO/LASCO oraz nową technikę określania prędkości CME.

Z analizy statystycznej wynika, że na samym początku ekspansja CME, zachodząca jeszcze w sąsiedztwie Słońca, podlegają kilku czynnikom, takim jak działanie siły Lorentza, wzajemne interakcje CME-CME, czy różnice w prędkości między początkowymi a końcowymi częściami CME, które determinują dalszą propagację zjawiska. Choć średnie wartości przyspieszeń katalogowych CME są zawsze bliskie zeru, a bardziej szczegółowe badania pokazują, że ich przyspieszenia chwilowe mogą być bardzo różne w zależności od warunków panujących aktualnie na Słońcu i w otoczeniu, w którym się propagują, warunki te różnią się też w zależności od danego CME oraz zmian w aktywności Słońca. Początkowe przyspieszenie charakteryzuje się szybkim wzrostem prędkości CME tuż po wyrzucie w wewnętrznej koronie słonecznej. Po tej fazie następuje mniej znaczące przyspieszenie (lub opóźnienie) resztkowe (rezydualne), charakteryzujące się prawie nie zmieniającą się prędkością propagacji CME. Pokazano, że przyśpieszenie początkowe przyjmuje wartości z zakresu 0.24–2616 ms−2, z medianą (odpowiednio: wartością średnią) 57 ms−2 (ms−2) i zachodzi aż do odległości rzędu 28 RSUN (promieni Słońca), z medianą (średnią) wynoszącą 7.8 RSUN (6 RSUN).

Warto zauważyć, że dominująca siła napędzająca koronalne wyrzuty masy, czyli siła Lorentza, może działać do odległości około 6 promieni Słońca licząc od Słońca, podczas pierwszych dwóch godzin propagacji zjawiska. Znaleziono także wyraźną antykorelację pomiędzy wielkością przyspieszenia początkowego i czasem trwania tego przyspieszenia. Intrygującym odkryciem jest to, że przyspieszenie resztkowe okazuje się być znacznie mniejsze podczas 24 cyklu aktywności Słońca w porównaniu z cyklem 23. Badania wykazały również, że analizowane parametry, czyli przyspieszenie początkowe, przyspieszenie resztkowe, prędkość maksymalna i czas prędkości maksymalnej, zdają się w dużej mierze podążać za cyklami słonecznymi i jednocześnie odzwierciedlać intensywność poszczególnych cykli.

 

Kontakt

Prof. Grzegorz Michałek

Obserwatorium Astronomiczne
Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego

G.Michalek [at] uj.edu.pl

Anitha Ravishankar

Postdoctoral Associate
University of Calgary, Canada

 

 

Oryginalna publikacja

Kinematics of coronal mass ejections in the LASCO field of view, Ravishankar, A., Michałek, G., Yashiro, S, 2020, A&A, 639, A68.

Przedstawione wyniki są częścią badań prowadzonych w Zakładzie Astrofizyki Wysokich Energii Obserwatorium Astronomicznego Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego w Krakowie. Zostały uzyskane przy finansowym wsparciu Narodowego Centrum Nauki w ramach grantu UMO-2017/25/B/ST9/00536 i grantu DSC N17/MNS/000038. Uzyskały również wsparcie z projektu NASA LWS pod kierownictwem dr N. Gopalswamy.

Astronomiczny Obiekt Miesiąca: Atomy niklu wykryte w chłodnym gazie wokół międzygwiazdowej komety 2I/Borisov

Deep fields lofarUnbound nickel atoms and other heavy elements have been observed in very hot cosmic environments, including the atmospheres of ultra-hot exoplanets and evaporating comets that ventured too close to our Sun or other stars. A new study conducted by JU researchers reveals the presence of nickel atoms in the cold gasses surrounding the interstellar comet 2I/Borisov. The team’s finding is being published in Nature on 19 May 2021.

 

Interstellar comets and asteroids are precious to science because, unlike millions of minor bodies that formed in our Solar System, they originate from distant planetary systems. Until very recently, the existence of such cosmic vagabonds has merely been an interesting possibility, based on the fact that our Solar System ejected most of the primordial comets and asteroids into the interstellar space in its early days. The objects came to light in 2017 with the unexpected detection of the asteroidal 1I/‘Oumuamua, followed by the discovery of the only known cometary interloper, 2I/Borisov, in 2019. “The scientific value of these objects is absolutely overwhelming, as they carry a plethora of information about their home planetary systems,” says Piotr Guzik of the Jagiellonian University in Poland, author of the new study on 2I/Borisov.

The gasses around 2I/Borisov enabled astronomers to obtain the first precious insights into the chemical composition of an alien icy world. “We were curious what atoms and molecules make up the gasses around 2I/Borisov,” explains study co-author Michał Drahus of the Jagiellonian University. There was only one way to find out. Over three nights in late January 2020, the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory in Chile was pointed at comet 2I/Borisov to collect the object’s faint light. The incoming photons were directed to the X-shooter spectrograph, which split the light into its constituent wavelengths, enabling the identification of atoms and molecules through their characteristic spectral signatures.

Guzik and Drahus immediately scrutinized the incoming data and realized the existence of unforeseen spectral features. “At first, these features seemed impossible to identify with standard cometary species,” says Guzik. After months of fruitless research, the team was close to giving up. But unexpectedly, a solution appeared on the horizon. “It was literally a ‘Beautiful Mind’ kind of situation, when the wavelengths of these lines materialized in a tabulated spectrum of comet Ikeya-Seki and pointed at atomic nickel,” says Guzik, who first realized the surprising answer. “It didn’t seem to make any sense,” Drahus adds, “but it really did!”

The problem was that comet Ikeya-Seki passed so close to the Sun that the surrounding dust started evaporating, releasing various metals. The same mechanism could not apply to the cold comet 2I/Borisov, which passed too far from the Sun. “The nickel in 2I/Borisov seems to originate from a short-lived nickel-bearing molecule that is incorporated in the cometary ice and sublimates at low temperatures,” explains Guzik. “This is really cool because heavy elements have not been observed in cold cosmic environments before.” According to the study, nickel is not very abundant, accounting for less than 1 in 100,000 atoms in the gasses around 2I/Borisov.

Kontakt

Piotr Guzik

Obserwatorium Astronomiczne
Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego

Piotr.Guzik@doctoral.uj.edu.pl

Michał Drahus

Obserwatorium Astronomiczne
Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego

M.Drahus@oa.uj.edu.pl

 

Oryginalna publikacja

Piotr Guzik, Michał Drahus: Gaseous atomic nickel in the coma of interstellar comet 2I/Borisov, Nature, 2021.

The study was supported by the National Science Centre of Poland through ETIUDA scholarship no. 2020/36/T/ST9/00596 and SONATA BIS grant no. 2016/22/E/ST9/00109, as well as the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education through grant no. DIR/WK/2018/12. The project is part of research conducted at the Department of Stellar and Extragalactic Astronomy of the Jagiellonian University’s Astronomical Observatory.

Astronomiczny Obiekt Miesiąca: Naukowcy z UJ publikują nowe obrazy radiowe młodego Wszechświata

Międzynarodowy zespół astronomów, w którego składzie znajdują się także naukowcy z Polski, opublikował najdokładniejszą w historii mapę Wszechświata w zakresie niskich częstotliwości radiowych, używając europejskiej sieci odbiorników LOFAR.

Aby tego dokonać, obserwowano wielokrotnie te same obszary nieba, by móc je następnie połączyć w jeden obraz o bardzo długiej ekspozycji. Dzięki temu na obrazie wykryto słabe poświaty radiowe od gwiazd, które eksplodowały jako supernowe w dziesiątkach tysięcy galaktyk, rozmieszczonych aż po najdalsze rejony Wszechświata.

Do tej pory radiowe obserwacje nieba w głównej mierze skupiały się na najjaśniejszej emisji, jaką możemy odebrać, czyli tej pochodzącej od masywnych czarnych dziur znajdujących się w centrach swoich galaktyk. Jednak obraz, jaki powstał na niskich częstotliwościach radiowych dzięki obserwacjom LOFAR-a, jest tak głęboki, że większość obiektów na nim widocznych to galaktyki takie jak nasza Droga Mleczna, których gwiazdy dopiero się formują. Połączenie bezprecedensowej czułości tego przeglądu i jego dużego obszaru na niebie - około 300 razy większego niż Księżyc w pełni - pozwala na wykrycie dziesiątek tysięcy galaktyk podobnych do naszej Drogi Mlecznej i położonych nawet na krańcach Wszechświata, w momencie, gdy jeszcze się tworzyły.

Co więcej, powstawanie gwiazd zwykle zachodzi w chmurach pyłu, które w zakresie fal widzialnych przesłaniają nam widok. Tymczasem fale radiowe przenikają przez pył, dzięki czemu możemy uzyskać pełny obraz tworzenia się gwiazd w galaktykach. Bardzo dokładne obserwacje wykonane za pomocą instrumentu LOFAR umożliwiły precyzyjne wyznaczenie związku między jasnością galaktyk w zakresie fal radiowych a tempem formowania się nowych gwiazd, a także pomogły w dokładniejszych ocenach liczby nowych gwiazd tworzących się w młodym Wszechświecie.

Ponadto, unikalny zbiór danych pochodzących z przeglądu LOFAR umożliwił przeprowadzenie szeregu innych badań naukowych, takich jak badanie emisji radiowej pochodzącej z masywnych czarnych dziur w kwazarach czy też ze zderzeń olbrzymich gromad galaktyk. Analiza zebranych danych przyniosła również pewne zaskakujące rezultaty. Na przykład, powtarzane co pewien czas obserwacje fragmentu nieba pozwoliły na badanie źródeł o zmiennej jasności. Pozwoliło to m.in. na wykrycie czerwonego karła – gwiazdy CR Draconis. Gwiazda ta wykazuje wybuchy emisji radiowej, które bardzo przypominają te pochodzące z Jowisza i mogą być wywołane interakcją gwiazdy z nieznaną wcześniej planetą lub być wynikiem bardzo szybkiej rotacji gwiazdy.

Obrazy radiowe nieba uzyskuje się w wyniku przetworzenia ogromnej ilości danych. Aby stworzyć obrazy z LOFAR-a, połączono sygnały pochodzące z ponad 70 000 anten wchodzących w skład tego instrumentu, co dało ponad 4 petabajty surowych danych, czyli około miliona płyt DVD. Przetworzenie tej olbrzymiej ilości informacji i interpretacja uzyskanych obrazów możliwa była dzięki zastosowaniu najnowszych osiągnięć matematycznych z zakresu analizy danych.

Omawianymi badaniami kierował prof. Philip Best z Uniwersytetu w Edynburgu w Wielkiej Brytanii, a wzięli w nich udział również polscy astronomowie: prof. Krzysztof Chyży, dr Arti Goyal, dr hab. Marek Jamrozy, dr Błażej Nikiel-Wroczyński z Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego w Krakowie; dr hab. Magdalena Kunert-Bajraszewska, mgr Aleksandra Wołowska z Uniwersytetu Mikołaja Kopernika w Toruniu; dr hab. Katarzyna Małek z Narodowego Centrum Badań Jądrowych.

Więcej...

Astronomiczny Obiekt Miesiąca: Próbka zwartych galaktyk radiowych badana na różnych długościach fal

Zwarte galaktyki radiowe (ang. Compact Radio Galaxies) stanowią szczególnie interesującą klasę galaktyk aktywnych (AGN, Active Galactic Nuclei) - z nowo powstałymi strukturami radiowymi (dżetami i płatami) w całości zawartymi jeszcze w ich macierzystych galaktykach obserwowanych optycznie. Dzięki temu dają naukowcom wiele informacji na temat procesów, które prowadzą do powstawania relatywistycznych dżetów w AGN-ach, i zapewniają unikalny wgląd w złożoną dynamikę sprzężenia zwrotnego pomiędzy ewoluującymi supermasywnymi czarnymi dziurami a ośrodkiem międzygwiazdowym. Międzynarodowa grupa badawcza kierowana przez naukowców z Obserwatorium Astronomicznego UJ opublikowała nową pracę opisującą właściwości próbki złożonej z 29 galaktyk tego typu, obserwowanych zarówno w podczerwieni, jak i w zakresie fal rentgenowskich.

Więcej...

Astronomiczny Obiekt Miesiąca: Czy możemy zaobserwować, jak pole magnetyczne rozgrzewa otaczający je gaz?

Pola magnetyczne potrafią wiele rzeczy. Uważa się, że kontrolują formowanie się gwiazd, wspierając kontrakcję gazu. Nie wspominając o już tym, że często zależy od nich cała ewolucja galaktyk. Są praktycznie wszędzie. Gaz też jest wszędzie. Czy jest zatem możliwe, że pola magnetyczne rozgrzewają otaczający je gaz? Aby się o tym przekonać, prowadzi się badania łączące analizy danych radiowych oraz rentgenowskich obserwacji próbki dość niezwykłych galaktyk spiralnych. Jedną z nich jest NGC 5236, miłośnikom nieba znana lepiej jako M83.

Więcej...

Astronomiczny Obiekt Miesiąca: Swobodnie spadające masy w czasoprzestrzeni fal stojących

Zjawisko fal stMapa znanych błyskow GRB z satelity Fermi LATojących jest dobrze znane z mechaniki i elektromagnetyzmu, gdzie fala ma maksymalną i minimalną amplitudę odpowiednio w swoich antywęzłach i węzłach. W kontekście dokładnego rozwiązania równania pola Einsteina przeanalizowaliśmy czasoprzestrzeń zawierającą stojące fale grawitacyjne w rozszerzającym się Wszechświecie.

Więcej...

Tworząc lepsze jutro - Odcinek 6: Gwiazdy

 

Szczególny typ gwiazd podwójnych, czyli układy kataklizmiczne, to główna dziedzina badań mgr. Sebastiana Kurowskiego, doktoranta Obserwatorium Astronomicznego UJ. W najnowszym odcinku z cyklu „Tworząc lepsze jutro” nasz rozmówca zdradza, jaką aparaturę badawczą wykorzystują nasi astronomowie do badania tego typu obiektów oraz wyjaśnia, jakie perspektywy pracy ma absolwent astronomii.

 

Konkurs "24-godzinny Zegar Słoneczny" - wydłużenie terminu

Zmiana regulaminu i wydłużony termin konkursu "24-godzinny Zegar Słoneczny"Fundacja TworzyMY Kraków zaprasza do wzięcia udziału w ogólnopolskim konkursie architektonicznym na projekt “24-godzinnego Zegara Słonecznego”. Zadaniem uczestników jest przygotowanie projektu małej bądź średniej, mobilnej formy architektonicznej w temacie zegara słonecznego, której funkcjonalność obejmuje działanie w systemie całodobowym.
Nagroda główna to 15 000 zł. Pula nagród wynosi 25 000 zł. Termin nadsyłania prac upływa 1.06.2021 r. Zgłoszenia i regulamin konkursu dostępny na stronie Organizatora.

 

 

 

 

Astronomiczny Obiekt Miesiąca: Korelacja jasność optyczna-czas dla ponad 100 błysków gamma

Mapa znanych błyskow GRB z satelity Fermi LATNa bazie obserwacji optycznych błysków gamma (GRB) odkryto nową korelację ich cech, która może być kluczem do wykorzystania GRB w charakterze kosmologicznych wskaźnikówodległości – nowych świec standardowych. Pracująca pod kierunkiem dr Dainotti (KIPAC, adiunkt na Uniwersytecie Jagiellońskim oraz badacz w japońskim RIKEN i Space Science Institute) Samantha Livermore (studentka fizyki na Tufts University) badała „emisję plateau” widoczną w obserwacjach optycznych GRB podczas swojego letniego stażu w SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory i na Uniwersytecie Stanforda (SULI). Prace te były kontynuowane w pracy magisterskiej Livermore.

Dainotti i Livermore współpracowały z dużym zespołem obejmującym naukowców z USA,Europy, Meksyku i Australii. Pozwoliło to na zebranie reprezentatywnej próbki danych oraz ichrygorystyczną analizę statystyczną. Te badania, będące kontynuacją wcześniejszych prac dr Dainotti nad emisją plateau GRB, objęły największą jak dotąd próbkę optycznych obserwacji plateau. Wyniki uczonych zostały zaakceptowane do publikacji w Astrophysical Journal Letters.

Więcej...

 

Starsze aktualności: 2020 2019 2018

Astronomy Object of the Month: New Optical Luminosity-Time correlation for more than 100 GRBs

Mapa znanych błyskow GRB z satelity Fermi LATA new correlation has been discovered in optical observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) thatmay be the key to using GRBs as cosmological distance indicators. Under Dr. Dainottimentorship (KIPAC alum, currently Assistant Professor at Jagiellonian University in Poland and Senior Research Scientist at the RIKEN iTHEMs in Japan and affiliated senior research scientistat Space Science Institute), Samantha Livermore (fourth-year physics major at Tufts University) investigated the “plateau emission” in optical GRB observations during Samantha’s summer internship at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University. The work continued afterwards during Livermore’s thesis research until its publication.

Dainotti and Livermore worked with a large team of international collaborators located in US, Europe, Mexico and Australia to gather a sizable sample and conduct their rigorous statistical analysis. This research, a continuation of Dr. Dainotti’s previous work on the plateau emission of GRBs, features the largest sample of optical plateaus in the literature to date, and has been accepted to be published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters.

More...

 

Tworząc lepsze jutro - 6: Gwiazdy

A special type of binary stars, i.e. cataclysmic systems, is the main research area of MSc. Sebastian Kurowski, PhD student at the Astronomical Observatory of the Jagiellonian University. In the latest episode of the „Tworząc lepsze jutro” ("Creating a Better Tomorrow") series, our interlocutor reveals what research equipment our astronomers use to study this type of objects and explains the job prospects of an astronomy graduate.

 

More news: 2020 2019 2018

Astronomy Object of the Month: New Optical Luminosity-Time correlation for more than 100 GRBs

Mapa znanych błyskow GRB z satelity Fermi LATA new correlation has been discovered in optical observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) thatmay be the key to using GRBs as cosmological distance indicators. Under Dr. Dainottimentorship (KIPAC alum, currently Assistant Professor at Jagiellonian University in Poland and Senior Research Scientist at the RIKEN iTHEMs in Japan and affiliated senior research scientistat Space Science Institute), Samantha Livermore (fourth-year physics major at Tufts University) investigated the “plateau emission” in optical GRB observations during Samantha’s summer internship at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University. The work continued afterwards during Livermore’s thesis research until its publication.

Dainotti and Livermore worked with a large team of international collaborators located in US, Europe, Mexico and Australia to gather a sizable sample and conduct their rigorous statistical analysis. This research, a continuation of Dr. Dainotti’s previous work on the plateau emission of GRBs, features the largest sample of optical plateaus in the literature to date, and has been accepted to be published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters.

More...

 

Tworząc lepsze jutro - 6: Gwiazdy

A special type of binary stars, i.e. cataclysmic systems, is the main research area of MSc. Sebastian Kurowski, PhD student at the Astronomical Observatory of the Jagiellonian University. In the latest episode of the „Tworząc lepsze jutro” ("Creating a Better Tomorrow") series, our interlocutor reveals what research equipment our astronomers use to study this type of objects and explains the job prospects of an astronomy graduate.

 

More news: 2020 2019 2018